25 Tomato Varieties: A Guide to Different Types of Tomatoes

An explanation of a few types of tomatoes, how to plant and grow them, and tips for the best harvest.
Avant Garden Decor's Tomato Variety Guide

Seven thousand five hundred varieties of tomatoes have been recorded. These varieties are divided into a handful of categories based mostly on shape, size, and purpose.

  • Slicing Tomatoes – these globe shaped tomatoes are used for mass processing or fresh at-home eating. Think vine tomatoes.
  • Beefsteak – their name rings true as they are large tomatoes used for sandwiches, caprese salads, etc. They are not generally used for commercial purposes because they have a shorter shelf life.
  • Plum – A heartier content used for pastes, sauces, and the like makes this tomato popular in canning. Think Roma tomatoes.
  • Cherry – These small and round tomatoes are commonly used in salads and pastas.
  • Grape – Small and oblong, this tomato is a compact version of the plum tomato.

You may also classify tomato varieties into two classes: determinate or indeterminate. If you are growing your tomatoes in a container you will want to choose a determinate variety. Determinates are bush-like and grow to a certain height. They tend to bear all their harvest at once.

Indeterminate varieties grow as vines and produce tomatoes again and again until frost kills the plant. For those who want ripe tomatoes through an entire season, like local farmer market producers and home growers, the indeterminate varieties are preferred.

Tomato suckers are the small growth, or shoots, that grow in the small joint of the stem and branch. If left to do so, the suckers will grow and produce another stem with branches, flowers, and fruit. They have a multiplying effect because the new stem will again produce suckers and the process will continue on.

Why would you want to consider pruning these? Indeterminate tomato plants get large and will keep producing all season. These plants will become too heavy if allowed to keep all their suckers. Additionally, if you let all the suckers grow they will compete with the plant for nutrients and water and cause your tomato fruits to be smaller.

Generally you should leave a few suckers to grow the plant and increase harvest yield, but overall you should prune them. Sucker extensions on the plant can be supported with plant staking systems. Expandable Stake Arms for Ultomato and Sturdy Stakes help add to an existing cage and can be added to grow with the plant.

25 Amazing Tomato Varieties

If you’re still having a hard time determining the best tomato variety for you, check out the details below. We’ve put together all the key facts on all the tomatoes from our Tomato Variety Guide.

Anna Russia

The Anna Russia tomato is known for its rich flavor and light foliage. It is most notable for being able to produce fruit, mostly in clusters of two or three, in the extreme growing temperatures on both ends of the thermometer. Watch out though, the Anna Russia’s thin skin can crack during heavy rains.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Anna Russian’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminateAnna Russia tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 80 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Mildly sweet and savory, great for sauce
  • Appearance: Deep red or pink, oxheart shape
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 11, good at temperature extremes
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratio: Loamy, pH 5.5  to 7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Antique Roman

The Antique Roman variety of tomato produces an oblong fruit that needs to be kept frost-free. These plants can grow up to 8 feet tall, so staking is a must. For best results, keep the shoots picked off with no more than six trusses.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Antique Roman’
  • Type: Heirloom, indeterminateAntique Roman tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 90 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Beefy consistency and savory flavor
  • Appearance: Plum-shaped, red
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 11
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5 to 7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Better Boy

An offshoot of the Big Boy tomato variety, the Better Boy is considered to be one of the best hybrid tomato types. One ‘Better Boy’ even landed in the Guinness Book of World Records for producing the most tomatoes from one plant – 340 pounds! Your Better Boy could reach 6 feet high under ideal conditions.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Better boy’
  • Type: Patented hybrid, Indeterminate Better Boy tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 72 to 75 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Juicy with a full flavor
  • Appearance: Solid red and mid-sized
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Altemaria Stem Canker, Fusarium Wilt 1, Gray Leaf Spot, Nematode, Root Knot Nematode, Verticillium Wilt 1, Cracking

Black Cherry

The not-so-sweet Black Cherry tomato variety is a favorite for many gardeners thanks to its hint of red wine. These cherry tomatoes grow on the vine in clusters of 1-inch globes, which make them great additions to shish-kebabs and salads. These plants can be easily secured by the Stake It Easy™, a tomato cage you can expand as your plant grows.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Black cherry’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminateBlack Cherry tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 64 to 70 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Rich and complex
  • Appearance: Black, grape-like
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to cracking

Black Prince

Known for being an early tomato variety, this dark-colored tomato has a deep red coloring when opened up. Remarkably delicious, the Black Prince variety does have a cracking problem, but plants tend to be very prolific. They grow between four and six feet tall, so they’re good for small spaces.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Black prince’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminate Black Prince tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 70 to 75 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Very juicy and fruity
  • Appearance: Tennis ball-size
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14, known to survive well in cold zones.
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Blossom End Rot

Brandywine

The Brandywine tomato variety made it to the American market in the 1880s and offers 12 oz. smooth fruits with old-fashioned flavors. This classic tomato produces vigorous vines and can grow as tall as 8 feet high. These tomatoes are great for sandwich slices, a salad topper, or canning.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Brandywine red’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminate Brandywine tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 80 to 85 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Classic flavor
  • Appearance: Plump, pink and red, beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14, best planted in the South
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Generally disease & blight resistant

Cherokee Purple

The fruit produced by Cherokee Purple tomato plants tend to be slightly flattened with “dark shoulders.” Inside, the Cherokee looks unlike most tomatoes with a highly chambered interior that can be green, purple, or brown. The taste of a Cherokee Purple is often compared to a Brandywine.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Cherokee purple’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminateCherokee Purple tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 72 to 90 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Winey and sweet
  • Appearance: Purple to dusty rose color
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Generally considered disease, blight and cracking resistant

Dixie Gold Giant

This fantastic, flavorful tomato is considered one of the best yellow tomato varieties; it’s also a late-maturing tomato. Each fruit weighs in at 1-2 lbs. and yields are said to be very good. These plants can grow huge – some have been known to reach 10 feet tall, so definitely cage them with your Ultomato early on and add more stakes as it keeps growing!

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Dixie gold giant’
  • Type: Heirloom, determinateDixie Gold Giant
  • Days to Harvest: 85 to 100 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet, tangy and meaty
  • Appearance: Yellow beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5-7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Good resistance and considered ‘dependable’

Green Giant

The giant in the “Green Giant” name comes from the fact that this tomato variety produces fruit that are positively huge — some weigh in at 32 oz. Eat this “green when ripe” tomato variety fresh. The Green Giant is said to have a “hint of melon.”  These tomatoes can be prone to sunscald, so some shade cover can be helpful. Watch out, these plants can get tall!

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Green giant’
  • Type: Open pollinated, IndeterminateGreen Giant tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 85 to 90 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet and spicy
  • Appearance: Chartreuse green, smooth beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5-7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Green Zebra

Green Zebra Tomato Plants can grow to 9 feet tall, so staking them is not an option. Like many green tomato varieties, it can be tough to know when it’s ripe. First, check for firmness, and then look for its green stripes turn yellow. The next step of ripening is when the bottom of the stripes turn a bluish hue. They are edible during each stage, so it’s up to your personal preference on the taste.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Green zebra’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, determinateGreen Zebra tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 75 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Old-fashioned, tangy
  • Appearance: Small, green with yellow stripes
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5 to 6.8
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Some debate on its disease resistance – some say very, others not at all. Considered cracking resistant.

Kelloggs Breakfast

These wild, orange, 1 lb. tomatoes are great for eating and considered very meaty. While growing, this tomato variety tends to be open and rambling as it reaches up to 8 feet. Kelloggs Breakfast seedlings often start out on the runty side, but give them a chance and you won’t be disappointed.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Kelloggs breakfast’
  • Type: Heirloom, indeterminateKelloggs Breakfast tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 80 to 85 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet and tangy
  • Appearance: Deep golden-orange beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 11
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 6.0 to 6.8
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Lemon Boy

These slightly sugary tomatoes can take a little longer to ripen in cooler areas, but they’re worth it! The Lemon Boy variety certainly lives up to its name with a yellow fruit that has a flavor that intensifies as it ripens. A high-volume producer, this plant will stand out in your garden as it towers over other plants and shows off its bright-colored fruit.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Lemon boy’
  • Type: Hybrid, indeterminateLemon Boy tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 72 to 75 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Flavorful and fruity with lemon tinge
  • Appearance: Yellow
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Altermaria Stem Canker, Fusarium Wilt 1, Gray Leaf Spot, Nematode, Root Knot Nematode, Verticillium Wilt

Orange Strawberry

With its heart-shaped fruit, the Orange Strawberry tomato is solid and juicy. The mild, tart flavor will remind you of yellow tomato varieties and works great as a salsa add-in. Growers report excellent yields from this plant that can grow upwards of 7 feet tall. You’ll want to stake these heavy tomatoes.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Orange strawberry’
  • Type: Open pollinated, indeterminate Orange Strawberry tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 75 to 85 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Slightly sweet, rich and meaty
  • Appearance: Orange peel color, ox heart shape
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Orange peel color, ox heart shape
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 6.5 to 7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Peppermint

Despite the name, not every Peppermint tomato will have obvious bi-colored stripes. Known for a sweet taste, the rare variety’s fruit is described as a flattened globe and good for eating. Each plant grows about 6 feet tall and has relatively narrow leaves, which will make staking this variety quite easy.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Peppermint’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminatePeppermint tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 73 to 78 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Flavorful and fruity
  • Appearance: Yellow with pink or red marbling
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0  to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Roma

This popular plum tomato variety is mostly used for canning and creating tomato paste. Roma tomatoes are sometimes called Italian tomatoes or Italian Plum tomatoes. These plants are great for small gardens, and usually only grow to about 4 feet tall. A vegetable trellis works well as the Roma plant loses its strength.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Roma’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, determinateRoma tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 68 to 92 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Classic tomato taste
  • Appearance: Oblong and red
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0  to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Altemaria Stem Canker, Bacterial Speck, Fusarium Wilt, Fusarium Wilt 1, Fusarium Wilt 2, Nematode, Stemphyllium, Verticillium Wilt, Verticillium Wilt 1

Rutgers

One reviewer says “you can’t go wrong with this variety” thanks to its high disease resistance and ease of care. As a stable and high-producing tomato variety, the Rutgers is often the “parent” to hybrid varieties. It’s known for a pleasing flavor, smooth skin, and ability to survive through hot summers.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Rutgers’ 
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, determinateRutgers tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 60 to 100 Days
  • Flavor Profile: A “good” flavor
  • Appearance: Candy apple red
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Altemaria Stem Canker, Fusarium Wilt 1, Fusarium Wilt 2, Gray Leaf Spot, Verticillium Wilt and cracking

Sara Black

The fruit from the Sarah Black tomato variety can weigh up to 12 oz. each and lacks a center core in the fruit. With a rich, deep flavor some say this variety is one of the best of the dark-color tomatoes.  Plant them almost 2 feet apart to account for their growth, and be aware for the potential for sunscald.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Sara black’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, indeterminateSara Black tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 90 to 95 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Rich, sweet and smoky
  • Appearance: Black or dark purple beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Sioux

The Sioux tomato – considered great for canning and salads – is another tomato variety that does well in hot conditions and dry regions. There is some debate as to whether this is a determinate or an indeterminate tomato, so your best bet is to let it grow for a bit and then stake it as needed.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Sioux’
  • Type: Heirloom, open pollinated, determinateSioux tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 70 to 80 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet and meaty flavor
  • Appearance: Red globes
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14, excellent in high humidity and high temperatures
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5 to 7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Stupice

Since the Stupice is a cold-tolerant tomato, it’s automatically attractive to certain gardeners since you can start it early. That means it’s a great “sweet-but-tangy” tomato for early summer salads! The plant, which can grow to 6 feet tall, provides medium-sized, round fruit throughout the summer.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Stupice’ 
  • Type: Heirloom, Open pollinated, indeterminateStupice tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 55 to 85 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet and flavorful
  • Appearance: Red
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14, high cold tolerance
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to cracking

Sungold

This bright colored tomato really stands out thanks to its 1-inch size and wonderfully sweet flavor. Despite the fruit’s small size, the tomato plant itself can grow up to 10 feet tall and definitely needs staking and tall cages. Despite that, the Sungold (or Sun Gold) tomato can actually work well inside a container. The Sungold is an excellent fall crop, especially in warm regions!

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Sungold’
  • Type: IndeterminateSungold tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 70 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Fruity and sweet
  • Appearance: Orange, cherry tomato
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14, high cold tolerance
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Fusarium Wilt 1, Fusarium Wilt 2, Tomato Mosaic Virus, Verticillium Wilt, splitting

Super Sweet 100

Do you want a lot of little tomatoes? That’s exactly what the Super Sweet 100 variety does. This hybrid grows long stems that can often hold 100 or more cherry tomatoes. With all that fruit, which produce all season long, this plant needs to be caged or staked. These tomatoes are very sugary and contain plenty of vitamin C.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Supersweet 100’
  • Type: Hybrid, indeterminateSuper Sweet 100 tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 75 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Very sweet
  • Appearance: Red
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Fusarium Wilt 1, Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Verticillium Wilt, Verticillium Wilt 1, Virticillium Wilt 2 and splitting

Tigerella

This striped tomato is on the small side and quite similar to the Green Zebra variety. Sweeter than the Zebra, the Tigerella goes from green to red and yellow as it matures. Growing to 6 feet tall, Tigerella tomato plants will need to be staked. In areas not under frost threats, a Tigerella plant can keep producing through a mild winter.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Tigerella’
  • Type: Heirloom, Open pollinated  indeterminateTigerella tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 85 to 100 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Very juicy
  • Appearance: Small, red with yellow and orange stripes
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Verna Orange

Verna Orange fruit can weigh in at 1 lb., and they are said to be dense and meaty with only a few seeds. The fruit from these plants are said to have an outstanding flavor akin to melon. This variety is great in a salsa or a sauce. There are a few complaints that some plants offer low yields from its often-droopy foliage. Try Use Safer® Brand Tomato & Vegetable Insect Killer to keep this plant healthy.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘Verna orange’
  • Type: Heirloom, Open pollinated, indeterminateVerna Orange tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 80 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Sweet flavor
  • Appearance: Orange, oxheart shape
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.5 to 7.5
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered disease and blight resistant

White Wonder

With its mild, sweet flavor, the White Wonder tomato variety offers a change of pace for many gardeners. They are great slicing tomatoes with high sugar content. Fruits mature to medium size with an off-white skin on bushy, 7-foot-tall plants. Height aside, you’ll want to stake these tomatoes since the fruit can weigh up to 2 lbs. each.

  • Scientific nameSolanum lycopersicum ‘White wonder’ 
  • Type: Heirloom, Open pollinated, determinate White Wonder tomato variety
  • Days to Harvest: 84 Days
  • Flavor Profile: Very light flavor, sweet
  • Appearance: Cream color, beefsteak
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 14
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH  6.0 to 6.8
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: —

Yellow Brandywine

Offering a similar taste as the Pink Brandywine, these ribbed, thick-skinned beefsteaks are wonderfully sweet and often earn very favorable reviews for taste. At 8 feet, the Yellow Brandywine plant’s large potato-leaf foliage can help cover the fruit. The height of the plant and the size of the fruit make staking absolutely vital.

  • Scientific name: Solanum lycopersicum ‘Brandywine yellow’
  • Type: Heirloom, indeterminate
  • Days to Harvest: 76 to 100 Days Yellow Brandywine tomato variety
  • Flavor Profile: Intensely sweet, “supreme flavor”
  • Appearance: A bit misshapen, Golden yellow
  • When to Plant: 42 days before your last frost date
  • Zones Preferred: Zones 3 to 11
  • Type of Soil: Well drained with some organic matter
  • Nutrient Ratios: Loamy, pH 5.0 to 6.0
  • Sun: Full Sun (6-8 hours per day)
  • Watering: Moderate Watering
  • Disease Resistance: Considered resistant to Blossom End Rot

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